Lady A Fires Back at Lady Antebellum's Trademark Lawsuit

"Here we go again with another white person trying to take something from a Black person, even though they say they're trying to help"
Lady A Fires Back at Lady Antebellum's Trademark Lawsuit
Following legal action by country band Lady Antebellum against blues singer Lady A, the Seattle artist born Anita White has spoke out against the lawsuit against her.

In an interview with Vulture, White told her side of the story, explaining how negotiations with the major label country band now wanting to also be called Lady A fell apart. According to the singer, she was sent a contract on June 30 that "had no substance."

"It said that we would coexist and that they would use their best efforts to assist me on social-media platforms, Amazon, iTunes, all that," White said. "But what does that mean? I had suggested on the Zoom call that they go by the Band Lady A, or Lady A the Band, and I could be Lady A the Artist, but they didn't want to do that."

As previously reported, White has been using the name Lady A for more than two decades. But on Wednesday (July 8), the country band now also wanting to be called Lady A filed a trademark lawsuit against her in Nashville court.

The country group — who are all white and just recently changed their name due to its association with slavery — claimed the Black artist and her team demanded a $10 million payment over the use of the name.

In a statement about the lawsuit, the band wrote, "We have come to the conclusion that we need to ask a court to affirm our right to continue to use the name Lady A, a trademark we have held for many years."

The group added that they were not seeking monetary damages or for White to perform under a different name.

In response to the $10 million demand, White said she wanted to use half the money to rebrand and donate the other half to organizations that support independent Black artists. However, that request did not seem to sit well with the group wanting to be now called Lady A.

"I was quiet for two weeks because I was trying to believe that it was going to be okay and that they would realize that it would be easier to just change their name, or pay me for my name," White explained. "Five million dollars is nothing, and I'm actually worth more than that, regardless of what they think. But here we go again with another white person trying to take something from a Black person, even though they say they're trying to help. If you want to be an advocate or an ally, you help those who you're oppressing. And that might require you to give up something because I am not going to be erased."

White also explained that recently she was unable to verify that her name was indeed Lady A while attempting to upload a new single to streaming services.

White has performed under the name Lady A, both while touring and on recorded music, since as far back as 2010.

In mid-June, a statement from the band Lady A said, "They have agreed that both should continue to move forward as Lady A." However, White disputed that claim, telling Newsday, "I'm not happy about [it] yet again after talking in good faith. … Their camp is trying to erase me and I'll have more to say tomorrow. Trust is important and I no longer trust them."